Diagnostic radiographer job profile | Prospects.ac.uk (2023)

Diagnostic radiographers use a range of imaging technology and methods to look inside a patient's body and find out what's causing their illness

As a diagnostic radiographer, you'll work in a range of hospital departments, acquiring images to help with the diagnosis of illnesses and injuries.

You'll work with the latest imaging methods such as:

  • angiography
  • computed tomography (CT)
  • fluoroscopy
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)
  • ultrasound
  • x-ray.

With experience, you may also contribute towards interpreting images, establishing treatment plans and helping with intervention procedures, for example the removal of kidney stones.

Responsibilities

As a diagnostic radiographer, you'll typically need to:

  • assess patients and their clinical requirements to work out which radiographic techniques to use
  • perform a range of radiographic examinations on patients to produce high-quality images
  • take responsibility for radiation safety in your work area, including checking equipment for malfunctions and errors
  • manage referrals to ensure patients receive a radiation dose as low as reasonably possible
  • supervise visiting staff and patients in radiation work areas
  • help in more complex radiological examinations, working with doctors such as radiologists and surgeons
  • provide support and reassurance to patients, taking into account their physical and psychological needs
  • supervise radiography and imaging support assistants
  • keep up to date with health and safety guidelines, including ionising radiation regulations, to protect yourself and others.

With experience, you may have the opportunity to get involved in management, teaching and research.

Salary

  • Jobs in the NHS are usually covered by the Agenda for Change (AfC) pay rates consisting of nine pay bands. As a newly qualified radiographer your starting salary is likely to be £24,907 (Band 5), rising up the pay scale to £30,615.
  • As an experienced radiographer you can earn between £31,365 and £37,890 (Band 6).
  • Typical salaries for advanced practice and management roles are between £38,890 and £51,668 (Bands 7 to 8a). Consultants can earn in excess of this.

Additional cost of living payments may be available to those working in London and the South of England. Non-NHS pay rates are usually competitively set and are often negotiated on an individual basis. On-call allowances and overtime payments are paid in addition to the basic salary.

Income figures are intended as a guide only.

Working hours

You'll typically work a standard 37.5-hour week, which may include evenings, nights and weekends.

Part-time work and job sharing are possible, depending on departmental needs. Career breaks are possible but you must keep up with technical developments during your time out and may need to take further training or study before returning.

(Video) HOW MUCH DOES A RADIOGRAPHER EARN IN THE UK |SAHOD NG RADTECH SA UK| LIFE IN THE UK VLOG #6

What to expect

  • You can work in a range of hospital departments, including the operating theatre, accident and emergency, outpatients and on wards, as well as in mobile units.
  • Jobs are available in hospitals and private clinics throughout the UK.
  • Self-employment or freelance work is uncommon. There are some opportunities for agency work.
  • The job can be physically and mentally demanding, and can involve moving and lifting both patients and equipment, as well as a lot of standing.
  • Travel isn't a feature of the role, although you may occasionally travel to conferences or training events.

Qualifications

To practise as a diagnostic radiographer you must be registered with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). In order to register, you must successfully complete an HCPC-approved radiography training programme at either undergraduate or postgraduate level. See HCPC - Approved programmes.

Undergraduate degrees take three years full time (four years in Scotland) or up to six years part time to complete. Applications are made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

If you've already got a degree in a science or health-related subject, you can apply for an accelerated postgraduate diagnostic training programme. Courses usually last up to two years. Contact individual institutions for entry requirements.

Both undergraduate and postgraduate training consists of a mix of study and clinical placement, approximately 50% of each. Subjects covered include:

  • anatomy
  • ethics
  • management
  • physics
  • physiology
  • the practice and science of imaging
  • sociology.

It's also possible to do an HCPC-approved diagnostic radiographer integrated degree apprenticeship, combining paid work with part-time study. Search the Find an apprenticeship or NHS Jobs websites for opportunities.

All students in England and Wales are subject to a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. For Scotland, see the Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme.

UK-approved courses lead to professional qualification, eligibility to apply for registration with the HCPC and membership of the Society of Radiographers.

You could also enter the career as a radiography assistant and work your way up to assistant practitioner. It may then be possible, with the support of your employer, to work and study part time to become a qualified radiographer.

All pre-registration undergraduate and postgraduate diagnostic radiography students on an eligible course in England can receive non-repayable funding support of at least £5,000 per year towards their studies. For full details, see the NHS Learning Support Fund.

Details of financial support for students studying in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are available from:

Skills

You'll need to have:

(Video) Medical Diagnostic Radiographer | 2020 | PR / Immigration requirements for Australia

  • excellent interpersonal and communication skills in order to explain procedures to patients
  • a supportive and caring disposition
  • good observation skills and attention to detail
  • self-motivation and the ability to work under pressure
  • organisation and decision-making skills
  • the ability to work both as part of a healthcare team and independently
  • confidence in using leading-edge technologies
  • IT skills
  • a high level of emotional intelligence to manage the emotional and distressing situations you may encounter.

Work experience

To be accepted on to a training programme, many universities will expect you to have visited an imaging or radiography department. Contact the imaging service manager at your local hospital and ask if you can spend time work shadowing a qualified diagnostic radiographer.

Previous work with the public, particularly in a health-related role, is also useful.

Find out more about the different kinds of work experience and internships that are available.

Employers

The majority of diagnostic radiographers in the UK are employed by the NHS, although there are also opportunities in private hospitals and clinics.

You'll work mainly in the radiology and imaging departments of hospitals, but you may also work in the emergency department, intensive care, neonatal unit and operating theatres providing mobile imaging. It's also possible to work in GP surgeries and clinics.

You may also work in research establishments, or within education, conducting research and training radiographers. Further opportunities also exist in veterinary practice, customs and excise, prisons and the armed forces.

You could also work as an application specialist for an equipment manufacturer, providing training and support for staff when new equipment is introduced in hospital departments, or as a sales representative.

There is scope to work overseas in hospitals, clinics and education or research establishments in countries such as Australia and Canada.

Look for job vacancies at:

Specialist recruitment agencies also handle vacancies:

Professional development

As a newly qualified diagnostic radiographer you'll have an initial induction followed by a period of preceptorship. During this time you'll get to know the policies and procedures of the workplace and have the opportunity to reflect on your practice under the clinical supervision of a senior colleague.

(Video) MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC RADIOGRAPHER OPTIONS FOR AUSTRALIA IMMIGRATION | STUDY, WORK & PR DETAILS

Once you've successfully completed preceptorship you must continue to keep up to date with the latest developments in treatment and care and associated technological advancements. You'll continue to have regular clinical supervision throughout your career.

In order to remain registered with the HCPC, you must carry out continuing professional development (CPD). The Society of Radiographers provides CPD support for its members, including courses, seminars, conferences and events, as well as a range of networking opportunities.

You can also take a post-registration postgraduate qualification in diagnostic radiography, such as the Masters in advanced practice radiotherapy, or a PhD. Search postgraduate courses in diagnostic radiography.

Management qualifications are also useful when looking to move into a management role.

Career prospects

Career prospects for diagnostic radiographers are generally good and you can work your way through the NHS grading structure in both clinical and management roles.

With experience it's possible to specialise in a particular area of diagnostic radiography, such as:

  • breast screening/mammography
  • computerised tomography (CT) scanning or sonography
  • interventional radiography
  • magnetic resonance imaging MRI
  • medical ultrasound
  • nuclear medicine
  • trauma/accident and emergency.

Alternatively, you could choose to specialise with a particular group of patients, such as children, stroke patients or the terminally ill.

As your career progresses, you may become an advanced practitioner and take on a higher level of clinical responsibility and management of patients. A small number of diagnostic radiographers go on to work at consultant level, where you'll contribute to the strategic development of services.

Imaging service managers are professional qualified managers and are responsible for the strategic delivery and planning, along with the day-to-day operational management, of radiotherapy services.

There are also opportunities to move into research or into teaching future diagnostic radiographers.

You can also work in management posts in the NHS, within education or in agencies or charities, looking at issues such as quality assurance or patient care, information and support services.

(Video) Radiographer Career UK I Useful Job Website Link I Great opportunities I #hcpc #radiographer

Visit Radiography Careers to find out where your career in diagnostic radiography can lead.

On a scale where 1 is dislike and 5 is like

Something went wrong. Please try again.

success feedback

Thank you for rating the page

(Video) HOW TO BE A LICENSE MEDICAL RADIATION TECHCNOLOGIST IN CANADA

FAQs

Are diagnostic radiographers in demand UK? ›

Radiographer jobs are in high demand within the NHS, and there are plenty of job vacancies across the UK. Depending on your location, you may want to consider roles in: London. Manchester.

Is there a shortage of radiographers UK? ›

The NHS is spending millions on outsourcing to prop up a shortage in radiologists, according to new figures from the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR).

Is diagnostic radiography a good career? ›

Radiography is a great career choice for those with an interest in medicine, who are keen to use cutting edge technologies. Radiographers do not just diagnose illnesses, but they can work closely with doctors and nurses to interpret images and formulate treatment plans.

Is radiographer a good career UK? ›

If you're a newly qualified radiographer, you can expect to start on a salary of £24,907 (which is band 5), and then you may rise up the pay scale to £30,615. Experienced radiographers will earn between £31,365 - £37,890 (at band 6).

Which country is best for radiographers? ›

Best countries to study radiography
  • Radiography in USA.
  • Radiography in UK.
  • Radiography in Ireland.
  • Radiography in Canada.

How much do band 5 radiographers make? ›

Salary. Jobs in the NHS are usually covered by the Agenda for Change (AfC) pay rates consisting of nine pay bands. As a newly qualified radiographer your starting salary is likely to be £24,907 (Band 5), rising up the pay scale to £30,615. As an experienced radiographer you can earn between £31,365 and £37,890 (Band 6) ...

Are there enough radiographers UK? ›

The UK is facing a nationwide shortage of radiologists, leading to increased waiting times and delayed diagnoses for patients.

Will radiographers be replaced by robots? ›

At the moment, it is difficult to see how AI will replace the responsibility of the radiographer to deliver the radiation dose. While AI may provide decision support, it will be for the radiographer to determine if the exposure factors or scan range suggested by an algorithm is safe.

How much are radiographers paid in UK? ›

New jobs added in the last day. Jobs in Reed.co.uk, ranging from £55,278 to £63,866. Jobs that pay more than the average (£57,964).

What are the disadvantages of being a radiographer? ›

Cons of being a radiographer
  • Demanding days. Radiographers spend a lot of their day on their feet. ...
  • Schedule. The schedule for radiographers depends a lot on where they work. ...
  • Career advancement. As a radiographer, there's little room for advancement without additional training.
2 Nov 2021

Which is better pharmacy or radiography? ›

According to your question,Radiologists earn comparitvely more than pharmist. Radiology technician earns 5-10 LPA. And in case of a Pharmist it is 2-5 LPA. Both are good in their own way,and you should go for the one which interests you.

Is diagnostic radiography stressful? ›

The stress scores in the survey population ranged from 6 to 46 with the higher scores reflecting higher stress levels. The mean score for radiologists was 24.7 compared with 19.6 for the general population.

What is the hardest part of being a radiographer? ›

Radiography Career Con #5: It's Can Be Stressful

The small amount of time you have to do an x-ray could be a life-changing event. It can be easy to make a small mistake when you are x-raying the chests of over 100 people each day. Radiographers come into direct contact with patients, so there is little room for error.

Is diagnostic radiography competitive? ›

Good interpersonal skills and being able to contribute to group discussions is essential. Entry to the course is highly competitive with approximately one place per ten applicants. Within your personal statement, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of the radiographer.

How much do MRI radiographers make UK? ›

Jobs in Reed.co.uk, ranging from £66,384 to £70,943. Jobs that pay more than the average (£68,798).

What type of Radiographers make the most money? ›

7 highest-paying radiology jobs
  • MRI technologist. National average salary: $61,370 per year. ...
  • Radiologic technologist. National average salary: $65,144 per year. ...
  • Cardiovascular technologist. National average salary: $77,740 per year. ...
  • Sonographer. ...
  • Radiation therapist. ...
  • Nuclear medicine technologist. ...
  • Ultrasonographer.

How much is a radiographer paid in Germany? ›

The average pay for a Radiographer is €33,044 a year and €16 an hour in Germany. The average salary range for a Radiographer is between €24,717 and €38,893. On average, a Bachelor's Degree is the highest level of education for a Radiographer.

What is the salary of MSC radiology? ›

1,75,000 - 2,50,000 PA.

What type of radiographer makes the most money UK? ›

What's The Most You Can Earn As A Radiographer? If you are able to gain lots of experience and qualifications and progress to either advanced practitioner or management level, you could earn a Band 7 salary or beyond. Band 7 salaries currently start at £38,890, while a Band 8a salary starts at £51,668 a year.

What is the highest band in radiographer? ›

The career path of a radiographer
  • Assistant practitioner. ...
  • Band 5 and Band 6 - Radiographer practitioner. ...
  • Band 7 - Advanced practitioner. ...
  • Band 8b - Consultant practitioner radiographer. ...
  • The advantages of locum radiography jobs.

How long does it take to become a band 6 radiographer? ›

Entry requirements

Degree courses take three or four years full time, or up to six years part time. There are also some postgraduate courses that can take two years. Once you've completed your degree, you need to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) before you can start practising.

How many radiographers are reported in the UK? ›

Table 1.
RegionReporting radiographer number (%)Total number (%)
Northern Ireland3 (1.4)4 (1.5)
Scotland15 (7.3)20 (7.7)
Wales15 (7.3)18 (6.9)
Total205259
10 more rows

How do I get a job as a radiographer UK? ›

To become a diagnostic radiographer you will have an educational background in a health or science subject, you will have successfully completed a radiography training programme approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and you will be registered with the HCPC.

Why is there a radiologist shortage? ›

A convergence of factors, including increasing demand for imaging studies and COVID-related burnout, is exacerbating a global shortage of radiologists. An aging population, increased Medicare enrollment and too few radiology trainees amounts to a triple threat, according to Vahid Yaghmai, MD.

What is the future of radiography? ›

In the future, radiographers will continue to have a key role in the imaging practice, be the professionals who interact directly with patients in imaging, and integrate and collaborate more with care teams across the patients' pathway of care.

Will AI take over radiology? ›

AI cannot replace radiologists. However, it can facilitate everyday tasks performed by radiologists. As a result, early adopters of AI will likely be at the forefront of the radiology field in the future. The impact of this question has caused concern and shifted the mindset of some radiology medical students.

Is there a future in radiology? ›

It is highly likely that in the future, the creative work of radiologists will be necessary to solve challenging problems and to oversee diagnostic procedures. AI will absolutely become part of their routine in diagnosing basic cases and helping to assist with repetitive jobs.

Do radiographers work nights? ›

Your standard working week will be around 37.5 hours and may include a mix of shifts, such as nights, early starts, evenings and weekends. As a therapeutic radiographer, you'll be paid on the Agenda for Change (AFC) pay system, typically starting on band 5.

How much do radiographers earn a month in UK? ›

The average salary for a Radiographer is £32,000 gross per year (£2,100 net per month), which is £2,400 (+8%) higher than the UK's national average salary. A Radiographer can expect an average starting salary of £23,000. The highest salaries can exceed £65,000.

What does a radiographer earn in the NHS? ›

How much does a Radiographer at NHS make? The typical NHS Radiographer salary is £31,234 per year. Radiographer salaries at NHS can range from £24,000 - £67,000 per year.

Is becoming a radiographer worth it? ›

It's a top-20 healthcare job according to the U.S. News annual rankings. This high ranking is because imaging is rapidly replacing exploratory surgeries and other invasive procedures.

What can radiographers Specialise in? ›

You may choose to specialise in a particular type of imaging, such as MRI or sonography. Some diagnostic radiographers work with specific patient groups, such as breast screening, children, stroke patients or cancer patients. You could also move into management, either within radiography services or general management.

Are radiographers doctors? ›

A therapeutic radiographer is an allied health professional who has undergone specific training to be able to deliver radiotherapy for patients undergoing treatment for cancer. A radiographer is also not to be confused as a radiologist as although they work closely together, they are different physicians.

Which is better between physiotherapy and Radiography? ›

The best one is the one you prefer. With that said, radiographer training will certainly require more math and physics than physiotherapy training. Radiographers will generally be employed by a hospital or radiology practice, as there will be very little call for a radiographer in private practice.

In which course radiology is best? ›

Candidates who wish to become Radiologists can pursue Diploma, Undergraduate, Post-graduate Radiology Courses After 12th. Some of the popular courses are B.Sc in Radiography, M.Sc in Medical Radio Imaging, B.Sc in Medical Radiography and Imaging Technology etc.

Which is better Radiography or medical laboratory science? ›

If you don't want serious patient Interaction and you want to mind your business do Medical Lab. If you want to use modern technologies to get pin point photographs of inyernal body do Radiography.

Is diagnostic radiography boring? ›

Well, the life of a radiographer is never boring! By learning to become a radiographer you can develop an interesting and rewarding career that puts you at the centre of patient care.

Is diagnostic radiology difficult? ›

Unfortunately, radiology is not an easy program by any standard. In fact, radiology residencies are notoriously challenging but not impossible! Here we'll go over what makes radiology residencies challenging, radiology residency length, statistics, FAQs, and more. Let's get started!

Can radiographers wear watches? ›

Visible jewellery and wrist watches are not permitted however a single pair of small stud earrings may be worn for pierced ears 7.

Is diagnostic radiography in demand? ›

Radiographers are in greater demand due to a population that is aging, expanding, and in need of radiation and imaging services.

Why is there a shortage of Radiographers in the UK? ›

Shortage of Radiography students

This is primarily because there has been a change in medical practice; imaging has increasingly been used as a vital confirmation tool for clinical judgement, rather than purely as a diagnostic tool.

How many Radiographers does the UK need? ›

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has confirmed in a written parliamentary answer that the centres will need an extra 3,500 radiographers to carry out diagnostics tests and 2,000 radiologists to interpret the results, as well as 500 advanced practitioners, who are radiographers with additional training to ...

How much are Radiographers paid in UK? ›

New jobs added in the last day. Jobs in Reed.co.uk, ranging from £55,278 to £63,866. Jobs that pay more than the average (£57,964).

Is diagnostic radiography competitive? ›

Good interpersonal skills and being able to contribute to group discussions is essential. Entry to the course is highly competitive with approximately one place per ten applicants. Within your personal statement, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of the radiographer.

What are the disadvantages of being a radiographer? ›

Cons of being a radiographer
  • Demanding days. Radiographers spend a lot of their day on their feet. ...
  • Schedule. The schedule for radiographers depends a lot on where they work. ...
  • Career advancement. As a radiographer, there's little room for advancement without additional training.
2 Nov 2021

Which is better pharmacy or radiography? ›

According to your question,Radiologists earn comparitvely more than pharmist. Radiology technician earns 5-10 LPA. And in case of a Pharmist it is 2-5 LPA. Both are good in their own way,and you should go for the one which interests you.

Are there enough radiographers UK? ›

The UK is facing a nationwide shortage of radiologists, leading to increased waiting times and delayed diagnoses for patients.

How do I get a job as a radiographer UK? ›

To become a diagnostic radiographer you will have an educational background in a health or science subject, you will have successfully completed a radiography training programme approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and you will be registered with the HCPC.

Can radiologists work from home UK? ›

Since then, COVID-19 funding has been provided across the NHS to support home working and many hospitals have used this to facilitate appropriately specified home working systems for their radiologists.

Is diagnostic radiography hard? ›

A degree in Radiography can be quite intensive. The material is not extremely difficult to learn, however, there is a huge amount of it to get through. You will have the same level of knowledge of anatomy as a Doctor. You'll also learn a lot about technology, physiology disease and injuries.

Can an American radiographer work in UK? ›

The HCPC will need to be satisfied that the overseas applicant meets the Standards of Proficiency for Radiographers. The HCPC also has requirements regarding proficiency in English and this is explained on its website.

Can a radiographer open their own practice? ›

Radiographers may also occupy managerial posts or may establish their own practice.

What type of radiographer makes the most money UK? ›

What's The Most You Can Earn As A Radiographer? If you are able to gain lots of experience and qualifications and progress to either advanced practitioner or management level, you could earn a Band 7 salary or beyond. Band 7 salaries currently start at £38,890, while a Band 8a salary starts at £51,668 a year.

What is the highest band in radiographer? ›

The career path of a radiographer
  • Assistant practitioner. ...
  • Band 5 and Band 6 - Radiographer practitioner. ...
  • Band 7 - Advanced practitioner. ...
  • Band 8b - Consultant practitioner radiographer. ...
  • The advantages of locum radiography jobs.

What is the highest paying radiographer? ›

7 highest-paying radiology jobs
  • MRI technologist. National average salary: $61,370 per year. ...
  • Radiologic technologist. National average salary: $65,144 per year. ...
  • Cardiovascular technologist. National average salary: $77,740 per year. ...
  • Sonographer. ...
  • Radiation therapist. ...
  • Nuclear medicine technologist. ...
  • Ultrasonographer.

Videos

1. AUSTRALIAN PR for MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC RADIOGRAPHER | Sonographer | Nuclear Medicine
(Dr. Akram Ahmad)
2. PROS and CONS of Diagnostic Radiology
(Yasha Gupta, MD)
3. Work, Duty & Job Responsibility of a Radiographer & Radiologist ||Career in Radiology |
(Anshu's Corner)
4. How I Prepared for my NHS Interview |Pinoy UK Radiographer
(Radtek Myk UK)
5. Careers that Care - Radiography Q&A
(Community Chesterfield)
6. Medical Diagnostic Radiographer Career Scope in Australia | Work Hours | Salary | Gender Preference
(A2z Immigration Updates)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Allyn Kozey

Last Updated: 01/22/2023

Views: 5434

Rating: 4.2 / 5 (63 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Allyn Kozey

Birthday: 1993-12-21

Address: Suite 454 40343 Larson Union, Port Melia, TX 16164

Phone: +2456904400762

Job: Investor Administrator

Hobby: Sketching, Puzzles, Pet, Mountaineering, Skydiving, Dowsing, Sports

Introduction: My name is Allyn Kozey, I am a outstanding, colorful, adventurous, encouraging, zealous, tender, helpful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.